We've detected you are coming from a location inside the Americas.

Please choose one of the following:

Close
Global sites: BSRIA Inc BSRIA SARL BSRIA Business Consulting (Beijing) Co., Ltd.
Phone+44 (0) 1344 465600 Contact BSRIA

Latest sustainability informationMarch 2007

The abstracts below show a selection of the latest Sustainability information held in the BSRIA library and freely available to BSRIA Members.

Schools for the future. Design of sustainable schools, case studies
Dept for Education and Skills
TSO, 2006, 105pp, sp, 620.92
Highlights sustainability themes that were consistently identified at a number of the schools investigated. Provides detailed case studies of twelve schools. Gives a brief description of the main tools that support sustainable design, many of which have been applied to the case study schools.

Green on the inside
Koerth-Baker M.
Consul. Specif. Engr., January 2007, vol. 41, no. 1, 22-24, 26, 28
Identifies the changes to building design as green engineering becomes the norm. Owners are now calling for a long-term, cost-saving, energy-efficient building that requires different technologies and systems to complement each other. Previously toothless codes are being replaced and can be used to acquire funding. Lighting with automated controls is now necessary rather than discretionary. Window shades, lighting and air conditioning have to work together.

Code for sustainable homes. A step-change in sustainable home building practice
Dept for Communities and Local Government
DCLG, 2006, 28pp, sp, 69.009
Provides a single national standard guiding industry in the design and construction of sustainable homes. In addition to energy and water efficiency, the Code covers other aspects of home building which affect the sustainability of a new home, such as materials, site waste management and ecology. Includes tables showing the criteria that assessors will use to measure achievement of sustainability performance.

Sphere of influence
Edwards T.
Elect. Mech. Contractor, February 2007, vol. 106, no. 1, 31-34
Reports on the environmental sustainability of Hadley Learning Community. Combining primary, secondary and special needs schools the services include a biomass boiler, rainwater harvesters to serve the garden areas and toilets, and an automated window operating system to provide natural ventilation.

Waking up to renewable energy
Hunt J.
Elect. Times, December 2006/January 2007, 12-13, 4 figs
Examines the renewable energy options currently available, including solar cells, MicroCHP, Heat pumps, fuel cells, low energy lighting and wind turbines. Indicates the key performance criteria and the opportunities for grants to offset costs.

Back to basics
Anon
J. RICS Bldg. Control, November 2006, no. 174, p16, 2 figs, 3 refs
Considers whether solar panels are the solution to the UK energy crisis. Identifies research that suggests a rethink of traditional construction methods would be the best way of tackling the energy problem.

Smoke on the water
Edwards T.
Elect. Mech. Contractor, November 2006, vol. 105, no. 9, 19-21, 6 figs
Reports on the redevelopment of an industrial headquarters building into luxury apartments and commercial space. The brief was to be at least carbon neutral. A variety of low carbon measures are being incorporated into the design including wind turbines, low e double glazing, heat pump, and mechanical ventilation for kitchens and bathrooms which allows normal vents to be omitted from windows.

Tyneside Trust goes green
Anon.
Health Estate J., November 2006, vol. 60, no. 10, 44-45
Examines how the redevelopment of an overcrowded and dilapidated primary care centre has provided an improved service and because the new buildings were subject to a mandatory energy target and environmental assessment the result is ecologically friendly and sustainable. The domestic hot water system is solar powered, and daylight and movement sensors control the internal lighting. Non-concussive taps cannot be left running accidentally and natural ventilation is used to minimise the requirement for air conditioning except for areas which could potentially overheat.

What is sustainability in lighting?
Lupton M.
Ltg. J., October 2006, vol. 71, no. 5, 22-23, 25-28, 8 figs
Proposes a philosophy for sustainability that is an integral part of lighting design and not an add-on extra. A triple bottom line of social acceptability, economic viability and environmental effectiveness should be as important as technology. Do standards and codes really meet the needs of today and should there be better lighting education?

Considers that the British public is increasingly accepting a green agenda and are prepared to pay a little more for environmentally friendly buildings. However developers and contractors are missing a trick by refusing to recognise this. Illustrates this argument with the Wellspring Centre in Bristol where elements such as the photovoltaic panels have been laminated into the glass in order to make people aware of the green aspect of the building.

Investing in a green future
Goodsall C.
Builder Engr., October 2006, no. 126, 30-31, 35
Considers that the British public is increasingly accepting a green agenda and are prepared to pay a little more for environmentally friendly buildings. However developers and contractors are missing a trick by refusing to recognise this. Illustrates this argument with the Wellspring Centre in Bristol where elements such as the photovoltaic panels have been laminated into the glass in order to make people aware of the green aspect of the building.

District energy in Southampton
Woodward S M.
Distr Energy, Second Quarter 2006, vol. 92, no. 2, 9-13, 3 figs, 1 tab
Explains why Southampton, a city of low density has the largest commercially developed district energy scheme in the UK. The drilling of geothermal wells in the 1980s coincided with plans to redevelop the city centre. The deregulation of energy markets allowed the introduction of large scale gas fired CHP.

A design that is worth repeating
Anon
Bldg. Serv. J., June 2006, vol. 28, no. 6, 52-54
Examines a school project in the Republic of Ireland of practical simplicity and repeatability with low energy design. Passive solar design ensures most classrooms face east or south. Electric lighting is by T5 fluorescent lamps with lighting controls for daylight availability and absence detection. Water use is minimised by automatic shut off taps and dual flush toilets.

Sustainable design and construction. The London Plan Supplementary Planning Guidance
Mayor of London
Greater London Authority, 2006, 102pp, p, 614.71
Sets out Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) showing what can be done in the current policy framework to design and construct new developments in ways that contribute to sustainable development. London Plan Policy 4B.6 relates to sustainable design and construction and sets the context for this SPG.

Alternatively contact Information at BSRIA:

T: 01344 465600
E: information@bsria.co.uk

 

Visa, Visa Debit, Mastercard, Maestro cards accepted BSI ISO 9001 Cyber Essentials Investors in People